Members of the cast of Short Life of Trouble attend the New York Innovative Theatre Awards Nomination Party.  Nominated for the Outstanding Ensemble Award.

Members of the cast of Short Life of Trouble attend the New York Innovative Theatre Awards Nomination Party.  Nominated for the Outstanding Ensemble Award.

Valerie Redd’s Hedda is the perfect cipher-inscrutable and yet utterly compelling. It is hard to take your eyes off her as she sedately prowls her parlor like a lioness in her den. Every move, every gesture, is as calculated as the low purr of her voice.
— A WORK UNFINISHING, Hedda Gabler
Redd has so much inner life driving her throughout the play we hang on her every word. Often, it is what she doesn’t say that is the most interesting.
— THEATER THAT MATTERS, Hedda Gabler
She’s a fascination to watch. Valerie Redd is a dynamic Hedda.
— THEATER IN THE NOW, Hedda Gabler
The Nordic-remote Valerie Redd [is] a Hedda who can’t seem to believe what’s happened, is happening, will happen. She keeps touching herself, carefully, as if to establish she’s real...Redd’s Hedda destroys lives; brandishing pistols and burning manuscripts, betraying some people, belittling others, encouraging great gestures and kvetching about hair, she is at once petty and grand.
— THEATRE SCENE, Hedda Gabler
Redd’s Hedda is less imperious and more grounded than some incarnations, while still suitably disdainful, [and] shows flashes of humanizing vulnerability.
— CULTURE CATCH, Hedda Gabler
Valerie Redd’s Titania is somewhere between the nymphs of classical art and the sirens of the 1950’s silver screen.
— THE AUSTIN CHRONICLE, A Midsummer Night's Dream
...projects a quirky onstage confidence and self-possession, a freshness and flexibility that relishes the unexpected…also a set of more traditional theatrical virtues: clarity of intent, physical precision, vocal strength.
— THE AUSTIN CHRONICLE, feature article
The cast has the crucial timing needed for a fast paced comedy.
— THE NEW YORK TIMES, The Wonder
smart and winning…Redd is part ingenue, part woman of the world.
— THE AUSTIN CHRONICLE, All My Sons
…[Redd is] enthralled to sensual abandon... she is at once the mythical Daphne, and the Sleeping Beauty, in love with a solitary dreamworld..the laurels should be lavished and shared here by all involved in this courageous production.
— THE HAPPIEST MEDIUM, Christopher Marlowe's Chloroform Dreams
Set in 30’s noir, the cast is great—-Redd is a gloriously wounded Daphne…[the] on-again off-again girlfriend on heroin.
— BROADWAY WORLD, Christopher Marlowe's Chloroform Dreams
Valerie Redd gives a fine romantic performance…(they are Hero and Leander via Bogart and Bacall, with a nod to Kurt and Courtney.)
— NEW YORK THEATRE REVIEW, Christopher Marlowe's Chloroform Dreams
When you have a company of actors who can not only sing, but sing in such stunning harmonies, you can’t help but fall…The music is bound to win you over and beg for a cast album to be recorded.
— THEATER IN THE NOW, Short Life of Trouble
The absolute standout [was] Valerie Redd…as Desdemona, Redd was the role, embodying the passion, fragility, and naiveté that would be her undoing.
— BROADWAY WORLD, Othello
Redd is successful and engaging.
— THEATRE MANIA, Eye of God